Tag Archives: Interview

Aloke Dutta Interview

As promised in a recent post, I collected questions from many Fourtheye readers, and then presented them to Aloke Dutta via the wonders of Facebook. A couple of hours later and I had a response! How’s that for efficiency! Without further ado I present the answers:

Is there any possibility of you playing with Tool again?
ALOKE DUTTA: Sure, once they get their shit together! Individually, all four band members are so occupied with their own artistic projects that I hardly see them. But, possibility of sitting with them will never die.

Have you been asked to contribute to their new album?
AD: Not directly.

What was the catalyst in working with Tool on a recording ? Or rather what attracted you to Tool?
AD: Love and respect between Danny and I for our personalities and our music are the main reasons I worked with them. Besides Danny, I adore other three guys’ musical depth, artistic sense, and their ability to articulate their emotion in a sophisticated way.

Since the tabla is more of a delicate acoustic instrument, was the overwhelming noise difficult to deal with playing onstage with Tool?
AD: Modern technology always helps. I remember wearing ear plugs when I played with them on stage a few times a long time ago.

Danny Carey’s drumming has a tribal texture to it. Did he actively study tabla under your guidance or was he more interested in learning some specific idiosyncrasies of the instrument and incorporate that into his technique/sounds ? Or both ?
AD: All of the above. Because, true knowledge does not have a brand name, not even a cultural identity. The divisions we know of are created by politicians not by genuine artists/writers/musicians. I do not teach people how to play my music. I, instead, teach them how to play their OWN music. I try to help them to make connection with their own music god. Once you are in contact with your deeper self, then all different music styles begin to sound like ONE. The state of mind at that level transcendence all the cheap human labels. Danny was already there when he came to me. He came to me only to verify it. (He also helped me the same way as I did to him, he just does not know it!)

In what ways does learning to play the tabla translate to ones overall drumming ability and technique?
AD: Tabla carries the wisdom of all drumming. Ancient Hindu sages provided lots of materials for all drummers to understand the time factor in music. This knowledge is not just essential but vital for all musicians as writing technique barely writes a poem. It is the philosophical understanding of the story helps one to write a meaningful poem not the way writer holds the pen. Tabla training by a true teacher can discipline everybody’s mind, body and emotions.

Are your lessons suitable for musicians of of levels of expertise?
AD: Most certainly. I do not show off. I try to feel the need of a student regardless of their status in the music world, and try to help them accordingly.

Are there any artists that you would like to collaborate with in the future?
AD: Hard to tell, because I am not talented enough to sit with anybody. So, currently, I try to create art all by myself like a poet, a painter or a sculptor who does it alone!

What are your musical influences?
AD: My father, Anadinath Dutta and his spiritual Hindu upbrining. Later, my close friendship with one of the greatest sitar maestro Nikhil Banerjee has a significant influence in the way I think about music.

What are some of your favourite Eastern artists?
AD: Anadinath Dutta, Nikhil Banerjee, Ravi Shankar, Ali Akbar Khan, Amir Khan, Jnanendra Prasad Goswami.

Who are your favourite drummers?
AD: Anadinath Dutta, Keramatullah Khan, Max Roach, Danny Carey.

What music are you currently listening too?
AD: Aloke Dutta’s Spondaic Oblation only to improve next time.

What is your favourite film/video game soundtrack and why ?
AD: I don’t watch film or play video games. But, a bunch of movies have my music on them though!

What is your favourite Indian dish? Do you enjoy cooking, and if so do you have any recipes to share?
AD: Blair Blake’s Chicken Vindaloo. You have to ask him for the recipe. All I know that it is a secret.

What is your favourite Simpsons episode and who is your favorite character?
AD: Again, I do not have a TV, but I have to say Lisa since she once wanted to play some tabla at her school.

Boxers, briefs or commando?
AD: Mostly commando, of course. It is all authentically pure tantric, baby!!!

Thanks very much to Aloke for answering the questions, and I’ll be chasing Blair up for the Chicken Vindaloo recipe!

Don’t forget that he will be playing in New York and Boston this weekend, and you can find more details here.

Aloke Dutta in New York and Boston

Aloke Dutta is playing a few shows in New York and Boston later this month, and promoter KC Solaris asked me if I’d give you guys a gentle reminder! Here’s some details:

Aloke will be doing a RARE 2 hour solo performance, a 2 hour Rhythm Concepts Workshop (description and details below), and offering Private Lessons in both New York and Boston. Tickets to both solo performances are available by pre-order here $25 Advance / $30 at the Door. Please also purchase ahead to reserve your spot at the rhythm concepts workshop which is described below.

APRIL 13th.
ALOKE DUTTA @ GREENPOINT GALLERY
390 McGuinness BLVD.
Greenpoint, Brooklyn NYC

Rhythm Concepts Workshop 2-4 pm Tickets available here:

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/333430

SOLO Tabla Performance 7-9pm

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/333462

APRIL 14th
ALOKE DUTTA @ FIRST CHURCH, JAMAICA PLAIN
6 Eliot Street
BOSTON, MA 02130

There’s more information to be found here.

Aloke has also agreed to answer a few questions for Fourtheye readers – so if you have any suggestions, please leave them in the comments section below, or visit this thread in the forums.

You can't beat an Aloke Dutta live performance

“I thought it was cool.” Adam talks about Limp Bizkit (and Opiate)

A new interview with Adam Jones appeared on Spin today, in which he talked about the recording of Opiate, as well as the upcoming reissue:

What went through your mind when you listened to Opiate again?
A lot of things. I’m proud of what we did. We worked hard, and it’s this little photograph or postcard from that time. It’s like a time machine.

What songs stood out to you most?
The live tracks, “Cold and Ugly” and “Jerk-Off,” which we don’t play anymore. I kind of miss them. Something else that stood out were the themes of Opiate and the way all the songs lead to [the title track]. It’s more the feeling of the record that hit me. It’s hard to describe.

Hopefully we’ll have something other than Opiate to talk about soon!

Justin interviewed in Rolling Stone Australia Magazine

Justin was interviewed by Rolling Stones Robyn Doreian during the recent interview frenzy, and it’s just appeared on the shelves this month. Here’s a snippet:

“It’s never taken us this long,” he says. “If it’s not happening, then it’s just not happening. We will not put out something we are not satisfied with. We are a bit slower this time. We are older, we are different and our situations are different. We are just accepting of the fact that it’s going to take a lot more patience.”

He mentions it’s unlikely the album will be out in 2013. Justin also talks about maturing as a person, M.T.void and how he expects the coming tour to draw from old and newer material during a “sensory overload” spanning several hours. Over all a relatively short interview, but full of interesting snippets.

For those wanting a copy, I purchased mine for just over $5 via the Google Play store. Here’s a link, though I’m not sure if it will be available to non-Australians.

Thanks to Calfium Jay for the tip.

Adam explains the Opiate 21st Anniversary re-issue

Revolver published an interview today with Adam regarding the 21st Anniversary Edition of Opiate. He goes into more detail about the recording and politics of the album, as well as the new artwork being created for it. He also mentions that there are no bonus tracks:

Overall, how does Opiate hold up for you 21 years after its release?
It’s kinda like a time machine. It takes you back to that time and what you were thinking. Creatively speaking, there’s always room for improvement. Playing some of those songs live 21 years later, you’ve obviously evolved. And now Justin [Chancellor, bass] is in the band, which makes it that much different and better. So it’s fine. I mean, I’m sure you’ve written an article where you go back and look at it and wish you’d set it up differently. So you can always change stuff. But I’m very happy with it. It’s really fun to give it a birthday and celebrate it. It’s more of a special thank-you for the fans. I know that sounds weird because we’re selling it, but we just wanted to make sure we did something unique and special with it—which is why rather than just reissue the music, we’re going back and readdressing all the packaging and artwork. I felt like George Lucas going back and adding digital effects to Star Wars. I know a lot of people are against that, but I’m into it. It doesn’t change the story. I think it’s great. It’s stuff that you wanted to do back then but you couldn’t.

Is there anything specific you would change about it?
Maybe the way it’s mixed. But there’s a politic in that whole thing, too. You can’t just explain it to somebody, as far as capturing your music the way you want. As far as my guitar playing? Yeah, maybe I’d redo a lead or use a different effect here and there, but overall I like it. It’s something I’m very proud of.

He also talks in a little more detail about the delay in their next album:

You mentioned earlier that you guys are in writing mode. What’s the status of new Tool music?
I guess you wouldn’t be doing your job if you didn’t ask. [Laughs] It’s unfortunate that we haven’t put anything out in a while, but you know, we’ve changed as a band. It’s just like a marriage—you grow older, people change, and you’ve gotta adapt or move on. We’ve become even more eclectic and distant, so getting things done and getting together is very hard. There are a lot of other interests. But what I really want people to know is that it’s not a bad thing. I’m serious. I think there’s a little more respect now, and when there’s compromise, it’s a little more open. I don’t know if that’s just a matter of getting older and going, “Ah, fuck it,” or what. [Laughs]

I’ve been with these guys a long time, and we’ve outlasted all of our peers. I mean, I try to think of the bands we came up with that haven’t broken up or broken up and gotten back together, and I can’t think of one band. OK, the Melvins. But that’s it. And we kind of set that up early by deciding that no matter who does what we’re gonna split everything four ways. Some decisions have to be unanimous. Others are put to a vote. We’re really involved in the business side. We write our own checks. But as far as the writing? It’s been a little more lax—as in relaxed. But it’s nice. We live kind of cushy lives now, so we get together when we want. It makes everything go slow, which is unfortunate—we all would have liked to have been done with a new record a long time ago—but when it’s done, it’s gonna be good. And that’s the point. We’re not gonna put out something that sucks just to put it out. We also had two really bad things happen, things that I’m not gonna get into, that set us back emotionally and mentally. But we’re past them now, everybody’s recovered, and that process has kind of actually added to us focusing on being creative. So maybe sometimes bad things happen for a reason.

It’s a great interview, and worth the read.

Maynard speaks to Triple J

Maynard and Mat Mitchell had a chat to The Doctor on Triple J today. The 10 minute interview covers a range of A Perfect Circle and Puscifer issues, Maynard’s autobiography and even has a sneaky Tool question thrown in (hat’s off the The Doc for that one). Reveals nothing new, however it is quite funny in parts and Matt and Maynard are both in fine spirits.

Update: While re-listening to the interview on the way home I realised it was actually Mat Mitchell, not Matt McJunkins! I like the photo of the double-t’d Matt, so that will stay for now!

Maynard speaks to Tonedeaf about Puscifer

Australian music site Tonedeaf recently had the opportunity to chat with Maynard about the upcoming Puscifer tour. It’s not a bad interview, though doesn’t reveal too much we didn’t already know either:

Between writing, recording, and moonlighting as an actor (he’s had bit parts in cult film and television), it’s a wonder Keenan finds the time to upkeep an award-winning winery.

“I’m not going to be able to dedicate twelve months out of the year toward the project (Puscifer)” he concedes, but as “anyone who works in the wine industry [knows], there’s a window of time where you have to be in there doing that, and so as long as my bandmates understand that, we can completely work around that schedule. There’s plenty of time in the year.”

Still, that’s the beauty of Puscifer’s flexibility and independence, beholden to no contracts or restrictions but their own – and as Keenan notes, he’s no tyrant.

The “rotating door works”, because of its dynamic agreement. A member departing for other commitments is fine; “as long as you’re not gonna get mad when I hire this other guy,” he confers.

The usual topics were not entertained, though considering A Perfect Circle are also touring I found it a little odd that they were off the agenda…

Adam speaks with Triple J

The Tool interview onslaught continued last night as Adam spoke with Triple J‘s the Doctor in a recent radio interview. A quite chirpy Adam talks about practicing new songs, dark parties with Rammstien, comic writing with Adi Granov, Vicarious mathematics, Danny leading the band live, rekindling a love for metal and tasers. The full interview can be found on the Triple J site.

Yet another Danny interview

Sick of Tool interviews yet? I know I feel like I’ve spent all day reading and posting them. This one is from The Rock FM which is a New Zealand radio station. Tracy had a chat to Danny about a range of topics which you can listen to here. For those not willing/able to listen, here are the main points:

  • Danny has recently done some recording with Jason Bonham and 12 other drummers for the upcoming Superman movie
  • There is plenty of material recorded, and footage available for a live album/DVD. It’s not on the radar at the moment but will probably happen sometime in the future.
  • They’re trying to concentrate on the new album for now, and Justin seems to be the main driving force behind this particular album
  • Tool hoped to play in Christchurch as well, but a lack of a suitable venue not earthquake damaged was a problem.
  • Danny still hopes they can release a new album this year

Interesting interview, it’s only 6:32 and is worth your time.

More Tool interview snippets

As Blair promised in the last Tool newsletter, there’s a bunch of new Tool interviews out this morning (it appears as though there was an embargo on the tour dates and the flood gates are now well and truely open). Here’s a few choice cuts from what I’ve read.

From David Farrier, who’s full interview should be in NZ’s Rip It Up soon, Danny talks about the newest track they’re working on:

David Farrier: I hear you are working on a big “Lateralus” type song for this album… how is that coming?

Danny Carey: Um, really good. I mean we’re still – believe it or not! – still working on it [laughter] – it’s like an ever-evolving thing, it’s probably going to turn into a thing that’s like, uh, a big trilogy type of feel to it, sort of life, just like Disposition and Intension and Triad, like on the Lateralus record or something. It will probably be over a 20 minute piece when it’s all finished, so it will be a good part of the record. We’re dealing with it in sections, but it’s coming together really well, we’re having lots of fun working on it, that’s for sure.

In the Fasterlouder interview I’ve already posted, Adam talks about plans for the Australian tour:

Adam, you’re responsible for the visual side of things. The Australian tour that you’re just announcing, what should we expect from the visuals on this tour?
AJ: I don’t know. We haven’t gone through the process yet, but it’s a process of talking, agreeing on a setlist and talking to our people and then we have a budget and deciding how can we really push that budget and make it mind-boggling and dark and entertaining for people and, again, give them their money’s worth and have fun, so you just evolve with the ideas. The first step is picking the setlist and then going out there and setting up video screens and lasers and lights and smoke and seeing how you can make it apply and advance what you’re doing on stage. It’s a reflective thing; it’s what I would want to see if I went to see a band. I want to see how they can enhance what they’re doing visually.

Have you talked about a setlist, yet?
AJ: No, sir.

Do you think we’ll be hearing any of the new songs?
AJ: I don’t know. We’re still in negotiations on that.

In the New Zealand Herald there’s a brief snippet from Justin talking about the new album, or possibly some other project. Not sure when the full interview is being released:

TimeOut talked to guitarist Adam Jones and bass player Justin Chancellor last week; they refused to divulge much about the new album – or say when it would be out.

“We’re currently involved in the biggest project of our lives,” is all Chancellor would reveal.

And that’s about it for now. No doubt there will be some more – seems as though Fasterlouder are the only Australian media outlet to put out an interview, but I expect there will be more.